Healing the trauma of war

Posted on Updated on

Trauma of war

This month I found an article on national geographic that I wanted to share with you. It is about war victims and their way to healing, and the therapy is using art to do so. I have worked together with an art therapist, and know its potential. Recently I also read a book by Norwegian art therapist working with eating disorder. Since trauma is what I work with the most, this article was very relevant. Not only relevant, but well-written with beautiful pictures. I have included parts of the article, but to get the full experience follow the link on the top.

Brain injuries caused by blast events change soldiers in ways many can’t articulate. Some use art therapy, creating painted masks to express how they feel

“I THOUGHT THIS WAS A JOKE,” recalled Staff Sgt. Perry Hopman, who served as a flight medic in Iraq. “I wanted no part of it because, number one, I’m a man, and I don’t like holding a dainty little paintbrush. Number two, I’m not an artist. And number three, I’m not in kindergarten. Well, I was ignorant, and I was wrong, because it’s great. I think this is what started me kind of opening up and talking about stuff and actually trying to get better.”

Hopman is one of many service members guided by art therapist Melissa Walker at the National Intrepid Center of Excellence (NICoE), which is part of Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, in Bethesda, Maryland. Images painted on their masks symbolize themes such as death, physical pain, and patriotism.

“I THOUGHT THIS WAS A JOKE,” recalled Staff Sgt. Perry Hopman, who served as a flight medic in Iraq. “I wanted no part of it because, number one, I’m a man, and I don’t like holding a dainty little paintbrush. Number two, I’m not an artist. And number three, I’m not in kindergarten. Well, I was ignorant, and I was wrong, because it’s great. I think this is what started me kind of opening up and talking about stuff and actually trying to get better.”

“I think he was one of the first patients I’d ever had to ask me to let him die.”

2015/01/img_5366.jpg

2015/01/img_5367.jpg

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Healing the trauma of war

    […] Healing the trauma of war – art therapy (mirrorgirlblog.com) […]

    didisreal http://traumadissociation.wordpress.com said:
    February 12, 2015 at 00:47

    Very interesting, I just linked to this from https://traumadissociation.wordpress.com/2015/02/12/flashbacks-in-did/
    Thanks for posting.

Your thoughts matter:

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s