trauma

Test your ability to read emotions

Posted on Updated on


<:header id=masthead>

<:article id=post-96430 sizset=”0″ sizcache=”9″><:header>

The Well Quiz <:time title=”October 3, 2013, 2:14 pm” datetime=”2013-10-03T18:14:27+00:00″>October 3, 2013, 2:14 pm <!– — Updated: 5:08 pm –>202 Comments

Can You Read People’s Emotions?

By THE NEW YORK TIMES
iStock

Are you tuned in to the emotions of others? Or have you been accused of being insensitive?

If you are among those people who are mystified by moods, new research offers hope. A new study shows that certain types of reading can actually help us improve our sensitivity IQ. To find out how well you read the emotions of others, take the Well quiz, which is based on an assessment tool developed by University of Cambridge professor Simon Baron-Cohen.

For each photo, choose the word that best describes what you think the person depicted is thinking or feeling.

 

 
 
 

 
 
 

 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 

I got 28/36, so there is really room for improvement. How did your test go?

 
 

Protected: The sound of blossoming seeds

Posted on Updated on


This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

Stressful content in a relaxed environment

Posted on


 Dear Nico

For me, the meaning of life is meeting people. When I discovered your blog, something pulled me towards it again and again, and I was so happy when we started to talk to communicate. I found Nico an incredible woman, whom I immediately liked and honored. To my delight, she also got something back from our conversations, and she eventually started to write for “free psychology”. Since then, she has published a lot of interesting posts about psychology. She has written her personal story, but also manage to integrate it with theory and own thoughts, and I admire that. For me, she`s an example of how it`s possible to truly follow your dreams, no matter where you come from.

I just want to thank you, Nico, for all the wonderful posts you`ve produced so far, and look forward to a conversation on skype. I`m glad I met you, and hope we can keep in touch for a long time.

Warm hugs from the other side of the world  

Stress and Memory From a Neuroscience Perspective

 

Stress and Memory From a Neuroscience Perspective

 “From a neuroscience perspective, amnesia in the absence of brain damage can be partially explained in biochemical terms. Stress causes a chemical reaction that affects regions of the brain responsible for memory. With repeated overwhelming stress, neurotransmitters and stress hormones are released in the brain in such excess quantity that they can adversely affect portions of the brain responsible for emotional memories as well as other kinds of memory.”i'm not out to convince you or draw upon your mind*Image Credits (all work used with permission through CC license)–
“i’m not out to convince you or draw upon your mind” by Andrea Joseph
“Standing at the Gates of Hell” by Shane Gorski  

Source:  p. 33, The Wandering Mind: Understanding Dissociation from Daydreaming to Disorders by John A Biever, M.D. and Maryann Karinch.

Related :

The Amazing Ways Your Thoughts Create Your Brain (philosophers-stone.co.uk)