Fear of job loss should not stop you from going to rehab

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This post was provided to me by a fellow writer.

Fear of Job Loss No Excuse to Avoid Rehab

If you are a professional with a drug or alcohol problem, it’s likely you haven’t sought treatment for fear of losing your job or setting your career on the sidelines. But it’s no excuse. Drugs and alcohol can wreak havoc not only on your professional life, but can also ruin your personal relationships. The signs of drug and alcohol abuse can’t remain hidden forever and by not seeking treatment you put yourself at an even greater risk of losing your job or worse.

Key signs of addiction

Depending on your drug of choice, you may experience everything from weight loss to hallucinations and physical illnesses including nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. The more you use, the chances that your addiction will become noticeable become greater with each passing day.

Telling your employer you have a problem

According to U.S. News & World Report, more than 75 percent of addicts are also working adults. And telling your employer that you need time away for treatment is a daunting task. Before you make the decision, look at your company’s policy regarding drugs and alcohol. You may also be able to find information in your company health insurance plan. Schedule a meeting with your direct manager and your company’s HR department and be open and honest about the situation. There is a good chance your company has policies in place to provide protection for those seeking treatment for substance abuse. You may also be covered under the Family and Medical Leave Act, which provides 12 weeks of reasonable unpaid leave to recover from medical conditions.

Handling it quietly

If you choose not to discuss your addiction with your employer, there are ways to skirt the issue at work without negatively impacting your career. If you have vacation time saved up, consider using it to detox at an inpatient drug treatment facility. Start your admission on a Friday afternoon and you can spend an entire 10 days in treatment before returning to work. Once you return, you will need to maintain an open line of communication with your support network, whether it’s mentors, family or friends. You can also use resources that are readily available to you, such as outpatient treatment and exercise to prevent your chances of relapse.

Continuing care

Your recovery efforts will be largely shaped by your willingness to make conscious decisions regarding your addiction each day. You must commit to a sober lifestyle each morning and keep at the forefront of your thoughts your reasons for staying clean. Since stress is one major trigger of drug use, you’ll also need to find ways to lower your stress levels or learn to deal with negative situations without turning to drugs or alcohol. It’s important to avoid other unhealthy ways of dealing with workplace stress such as smoking and overeating, which the American Psychological Association insists only compound the problem.

Psychology Today explains that recovery is built on the pillars of community, purpose, home and health. You can use each of these to your advantage throughout your recovery plan. Your community can serve as your safety net, understanding your purpose will help you continue to contribute to the greater good, your home is a respite from the outside world and your health will give you the strength to continue fighting.

Whether or not you choose to discuss your addiction problems with your employer is a personal decision. However, you won’t do yourself any favors by continuing to go down a path of self-destruction. If you think you have a problem, seek help now or risk losing yourself deeper down the spiral of addiction.

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Going back to Budapest

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On Friday I’m going back to Budapest to attend an wedding. I haven’t seen Zoltán for ages, so this will definitively be an emotional reunion. I will be at the wedding a whole day, and on the site we can swim, play table-tennis or use a canoe. I will sleep in a tent before I go back to Budapest on Sunday. I look forward to meeting new people and celebrating true love. I am excited about being in Budapest again too. Last time I only had two days there, and now I will have two more before I go back home. Any recommendations about where I should go?

I am adding some picture from last time I was there.

Protected: The sound of ringing the alarm

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Protected: Because I miss you too much

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Protected: Bipolar superpower

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Recovery Tips for the Optimal You

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Recovery Tips for the Optimal You

This is an article by Adam Cook that he wanted to share on my blog.

Adam Cook is the founder of Addiction Hub, which locates and catalogs addiction resources. He is very much interested in helping people find the necessary resources to save their lives from addiction.

Addiction recovery is difficult. Its success is not measured quickly, but rather over a long period of time. People often speak of beating addiction, but the real challenge is not defeating one’s substance abuse but being able to successfully contribute to your recovery. Relapse can happen anytime, but it is also quite possible to avoid if one works hard and surrounds oneself in the right kind of support. There are ways to bolster ones recovery to ensure success in the long run.

One way to help maintain sustainable sobriety is through a holistic perspective. Holistic refers to a whole-body approach to dealing with conditions such as addiction. A whole-body approach treats not only the addiction, but also its causes, while simultaneously providing comfort and support so that long-term change is possible.

Create a healthier you through diet and exercise
Optimal physical health is crucial to successful recovery. One can ensure health by eating right and increasing their physical activity. Those who have dealt with addiction also might find that they are nutritionally challenged. Substance abuse is so diametrically opposed to healthy living that addicts’ diets are often horrendous. Bodies are physically ravaged from addiction, too, so nutrition is needed to repair damage.

This year, focus on your diet by incorporating more vegetables and good fats. All vegetables and fruits are healthful, but adding avocados and olive oil can make you feel more full and satisfied. Believe it or not, doctors and nutritionists now advocate for bacon as a component of a healthy diet. So enjoy a salad with bacon and avocado and watch your health improve, little by little.

Exercise is another way to improve one’s health holistically. Fitness helps build strength that is crucial for stamina during recovery. Exercise also can help push addictive behaviors out of one’s life. Exercise triggers similar brain chemicals that result from using substances. When people work out, they feel senses of elation and stamina. Both of these characteristics help in managing addiction.

More importantly, exercise and diet foster healthy living. When someone exercises and eats better, they tend to make other decisions that support both of these components of their life. When you have a great day working out, you are less likely to eat junk food, go drinking or skip sleep or rest. The positive quality of exercise and diet can help those fighting addiction to persevere.

Get outdoors and benefit from nature
When exercising, try to incorporate some outdoor activities in the mix. As helpful as exercise is to managing addiction, outdoor exposure is linked to increased mood. When you feel better, you are much more likely to strive to be better. Outdoor exercises that are helpful include hiking, walking, running, cycling and swimming. Each of these exercises can also be done indoors to some degree, but the natural element simply takes the experience to another level. Treadmills and stationary bikes are boring. A beautiful mountain vista is anything but boring.

Keep sobriety going with a positive hobby
Another way to support addiction recovery is through finding a positive hobby. It doesn’t matter so much what the hobby is – just make sure that it is something that you enjoy. The overall goal is to fill your life with positive and rewarding activities. Hobbies can bring joy to anyone’s life, but are especially beneficial for someone going through recovery.

By combining a healthy diet, exercise, outdoor exposure and hobbies, anyone who is going through addiction recovery can help power through the tough days. This fuel is key to sustained addiction management.

At peace 

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I am in a contemplative state. My mind is full of thoughts about life. I am thinking about some patients that has touched me, and the new job I’ve begun in. It is still amazing to me that I have come so far in my life. 

Now i will rest for a while,

Quote from Pinterest

Summertime gladness

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In two weeks we will be in Croatia. I can’t wait, but unfortunately have to. Not only that, these two weeks will be very busy, since I have much work to do. Due to a change in the group of patients I will work with, I have to say goodbye to many of my trauma patients (but not all, luckily), and that means overtime.

But, it will be worth it. I can process the loss of not seeing many of my lovely patients while lying on a beach in split, and look forward to all the wonderful people I will see in my office come August.

The sound of earthquakes

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You stand there. From one moment to the next, an ordinarily day is turned into a nightmare. The earth starts shaking. Objects are falling down, shattering when they hit the floor. You freeze, trying to not move. Your heart thumps, terrified. Will you survive this earthquake ? 
earth

The sound of anachronism

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When I open my mouth.

My whole heart comes out.

I don’t even care what the world thinks about how I sound

Christina Aguilera, Sing For Me

water

Anachronism (noun): an error in chronology; a person or thing that’s chronologically out of place

I put my hand under the faucet, letting cold water touch my skin, skin warmed up by my boiling mind. I am here. The really cold water reminds me of this simple fact that we often forget. I close my eyes a bit, to enjoy the sensation.

Closing my eyes brings back memories from other times when I was not in the here and now. When my chaotic life consisted of more tomorrows and yesterdays than life today. That was the time when my colors were grey, my mood black and my road consisted of an invisible color. I made no sound then, only some lamenting noises that I`d rather mute.

We come to this world from a watery place that feels safe like a warm, cozy house. There we are all alike, we know nothing more except what our fluid surroundings tell us. When we finally come out to our version of reality, we have to find our place in it.  Some of us, never quite do. At one point we`d rather be at a mountain top, smoking plants with ancient monks, at another rather lie burrowed in the earth we supposedly come from. We swim upstream and downstream, seldom relaxing to just float. Bubbles burst, and shattered pieces remind us of who we once were.

Last year I got the chance to travel to dream-destinations of mine. China. It was my chance to be in my tomorrows, walk on my mountain-tops and my chance to just be. comP9c165416270d54f35ead568db79bdc96From early on, I feel in love with simple life-views portrayed in movies like Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter and.. Spring and books like “Eat pray, love”. The first steps to some of these philosophical views were mapped out by Asians, so the wish to walk at the same earth as they did,  grew until the turning compass-needle in my heart pointed directly at Asia. What would I see in my own personal mirror?

One of the many places I got the chance to touch with my Norwegian shoes, was Hong Kong. There I enjoyed an extraordinary experience where I sure felt out of place constantly, silently enjoying it.

When you eat, do you taste every bit like it would be your last? When I was a child, I remember how I enjoyed a German chocolate after coming back to Norway. I saved it as long as I could, prolonging the joyful taste and thereby squeezing more happiness from it. I did this since I knew it would be long until next time a piece of  Yogurette could melt on my tongue. The more grown-up and richer one gets, the less one savors what enters our senses. For this reason, “Dialogue in the dark” was just what my under-stimulated nerve-cells needed. Before I attended this unorthodox tourist-experience, I just knew that it was created by blind people, and that we would learn something from it. My inner owl hooted in satisfaction, even when someone put a blindfold over me over me and 9 other unknown people’s eyes. It was pitch dark, but the next hour were filled with so much color that it felt like I finally could see again.

sympho
the sound of anachronism

I heard a classical piece of music that whirred up strong emotions, I touched objects that made my senses boomerang in wonder. I heard sounds never noticed before, and my body was drenched in water that almost crept under my skin. The excitement I felt was doubled by the mere presence of the strangers around me who had their own surprised exclaims and sounds. Although I`ll never meet those people again, their voices and laughter has left an imprint on my soul.

The exquisite meal we had at the end, felt like it must have done for the 12 disciples. With no sight and no disturbing white noise, I could fully appreciate what I tasted and how lucky I was to be there.

I sure felt the truth of this after we had touched, tasted, felt and walked in the dark, but shining, room in Hong Kong. In the loud silence of our journey through the dark, I could focus completely on how the food tasted and felt. I also had time to appreciate the fact that I sat there, completely free from inhibitions and restrictions, enjoying food some children never get to taste. I am one of the one percent of the population with this chance,

Even if this can be categorized under the most disorganized experiences of my life, I have never felt so clear about anything before.

Where have you arrived, and what is the sound of your symphony in the dark?

 Daily Prompt 

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